Saturday, July 11, 2020

Puffins Prove Seabirds Are Smart Enough to Use Tools

Must Read

SDCC 2020 [At Home] Saturday Schedule: “Bill & Ted,” “What We Do In The Shadows”

We've been doing our best to keep you appraised as to the schedules coming for San Diego...

Nerdbot Cosplay Spotlight: Meet Miss Ada Mist

Here at Nerdbot we have a group of beautiful women who love showing their geeky side called Nerdplay Girls, this is Ada Mist.

Digimon Announces Two Online Conventions This Year

Digimon is going to have two online conventions this year. The first happening this month!
Breana Ceballoshttp://www.nerdbot.com
Hi! I am the Managing Editor for Nerdbot.com I enjoy watching anime, learning about new things and keeping up with Nerd Culture. I love writing and hope to introduce people to things that they may not have known about before through my articles. If you think you may be interested in submitting a guest article please check out the "Write for Nerdbot" section on the main page!

Annette Fayet who has been studying and observing Puffins for years has captured photographic proof that Puffins are smart enough to use tools. First seeing a Puffin on the water use a stick to scratch its back, she waited another 4 years until she was able to capture a moment like it on video. Giving scientists proof that seabirds, who were once thought not intelligent enough to use tools in any way, are capable of using found tools.

Other known birds who can use tools are the Egyptian Vultures who are able to break Ostrich eggs with rocks, or some parrots who are able to also use rocks to grind down seashells. Seabirds were written off because of the size of their brains but now we have more proof that they may be adapting.

Related  The "Safer" Rebuild of the Titanic Will be Setting Sail in 2022

What this illustrates is that the Puffins can identify a problem and find a solution. The problem in this situation is an itch and the solution is a stick. Since they don’t have arms or fingers that can scratch they had to find another way to get it done. And using a stick is really very innovative, for a bird.

Fayet also noted that the video footage was caught in 2018, which was an especially bad tick season. Ticks are the most common parasite among puffins so they may have started using sticks to flick them off. Which is again, very intelligent.

You can follow Annette Fayet’s studies by searching her on Google Scholar.

Related  DEVO Wants Fans To Whip It, Whip It Good Against Coronavirus

Latest News

SDCC 2020 [At Home] Saturday Schedule: “Bill & Ted,” “What We Do In The Shadows”

We've been doing our best to keep you appraised as to the schedules coming for San Diego...
Related  5 Amazing Animals to Know

Nerdbot Cosplay Spotlight: Meet Miss Ada Mist

Here at Nerdbot we have a group of beautiful women who love showing their geeky side called Nerdplay Girls, this is Ada Mist.

Digimon Announces Two Online Conventions This Year

Digimon is going to have two online conventions this year. The first happening this month!

Celebrate Nikola Tesla’s Birthday with “Tesla” Advance Screening!

In a perfect world, schoolchildren would learn about the marvelous Wizard of the West, inventor and man out of time, Nikola Tesla,...

“Vikings” Last Raid Comes to SDCC 2020 [At Home]

We are heartbroken to type the words "last raid" for one of our absolute favorite shows, HISTORY's "Vikings." Such a staple and...

More Articles Like This