Sunday, September 20, 2020

Kids Want More Female Superheroes, BBC America Study Says

Must Read

Six Fictional Places Have Been Turned Into Polly Pockets

We want all of these amazing fictional location Polly Pockets!

Person Reenacts “Blues Brothers” Bridge Jump Stunt in Detroit

We WISH we were making this up, but this is completely a real thing that happened in...

There’s a Buff Pokémon Coloring Book That We Need to Own Now

Yeah... we're going to need this buff AF Pokémon coloring book ASAP
Loryn Stonehttp://www.nerdbot.com
Loryn Stone has dedicated her life to the written Word of the Nerd. Her writing has also been published on other pop culture websites such as Cracked, LoadScreen, PopLurker, and Temple of Geek. Her debut young-adult novel "My Starlight" (a contemporary love letter to fandom, friendship, anime, cosplaying, love, and loss) is out now by Affinity Rainbow Publications. When she's not writing, Loryn's other interests include collecting robots (Megazords, specifically), playing bass, and blasting metal.

It’s no secret that sci-fi and superhero stories are largely the domain of male characters, even in the era of Wonder Woman and the first female Doctor Who.

A new study suggests, as stated by The Hollywood Reporter, the gender gap in onscreen representation in superhero and sci-fi films and TV series can have real-world effects on even the youngest consumers of such media. Teenage girls are less likely than boys to describe themselves as confident, brave and listened to, and nearly two-thirds of girls 10-19 say they don’t see enough role models or strong and relatable characters of their own gender onscreen.

The study suggests that boys want to see more female characters in superhero stories and sci-fi narratives, with 69 percent of boys aged 10-19 wanting more female characters in their stories. Roughly 85 percent of girls said the same thing. Over 80 percent of parents of young children also want to see more female superheroes.

The study found that three-fourths of girls age 10-19 said their favorite female superheroes help them feel strong and inspired.

Six out of 10 also said that seeing female heroes helps them feel like they can do anything. This was especially the case for girls of color, 63 percent of whom reacted positively to the impact of female sci-fi heroes or superheroes.

This study, conducted by BBC America, is clearly so imperative to learning the needs of children consuming media. Not only do girls want to see representation of themselves, but it’s important that the next wave of boys see women in a positive and inspirational light.

Latest News

Person Reenacts “Blues Brothers” Bridge Jump Stunt in Detroit

We WISH we were making this up, but this is completely a real thing that happened in...
Html code here! Replace this with any non empty raw html code and that's it.

Person Reenacts “Blues Brothers” Bridge Jump Stunt in Detroit

We WISH we were making this up, but this is completely a real thing that happened in the city of Detroit. Some...

There’s a Buff Pokémon Coloring Book That We Need to Own Now

Yeah... we're going to need this buff AF Pokémon coloring book ASAP

A New Rideable Pikachu Pokémon Air Toy is Coming!

A fun new rideable toy is coming for kids and kids at heart from Pokémon Air!

“AKIRA” Ultra HD Remaster Set Available for Pre Order Now

At long last, fans can pre-order the brand new Funimation Ultra HD 4K remaster of Katsuhiro Otomo's seminal piece of anime, "AKIRA."
- Advertisement -

More Articles Like This