Irish Gymnast Debunks Tokyo Olympics’ “Anti-Sex” Bed Myth

Photos from the bedrooms of athletes completing in the 2021 Olympics in Tokyo have been going viral. Probably not for the reason we would hope for.

Dubbed “anti-sex” beds by places like Entrepreneur, these beds are made of cardboard, and not meant for any type of…extracurricular activities.

According to Entrepreneur, these beds “can’t stand sudden movements or celebrations. The organizers have stated that they are perfectly designed to support the weight of a single person, but that they cannot or should not be jumped on, as they can break.

Now thanks to Irish Gymnast Rhys McClenaghan, we know that the name was all for hype. You can actually do many different activities on these beds.

Just watch him test them out!

So how did this rumor get started? Team USA distance runner Paul Chelimo posted to his Twitter that the “beds to be installed in Tokyo Olympic Village will be made of cardboard, this is aimed at avoiding intimacy among athletes.” Which was then liked 27,000 times. Now we’re not sure if officials described the beds thusly to Chelimo in passing or if he came up with this on his own, but that’s where the big story came from.

They were created to be more sustainable than regular beds. Other sustainable solutions that Tokyo is offering in their venues is renewable electricity. The beds are able to withstand up to 441 pounds. So this was a real “Mythbusters” episode of an anti-sex bed debunked thanks to Rhys.

Just like previous Olympics, Japan is distributing a total of 160,000 condoms to the athletes, just in case. Japan hopes that they take them as a symbol of promoting safe sex and good health.

The opening ceremonies are scheduled to air at 6:55 am (EST), 3:55 am (PT) in the US, on NBC and streaming services.

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