Tuesday, September 29, 2020

A Completed Stonehenge Would Have Had Amazing Acoustics Inside The Monument

Must Read

Amazon Nabs “Borat” Sequel, Will Premiere Film Before Election Day

We are delighted to report that "Borat: Gift of Pornographic Monkey to Vice Premiere Mikhael Pence to...

Classic Power Rangers Morphin’ Figures Making a Return!

If you're someone who grew up in the 90s, chances are you wanted (or managed to get)...

Blumhouse’s Upcoming “The Craft: Legacy” Trailer Hits

It's almost spooky season, and that means Blumhouse FINALLY released a trailer for their upcoming revisit of...
Breana Ceballoshttp://www.nerdbot.com
Hi! I am the Managing Editor for Nerdbot.com I enjoy watching anime, learning about new things and keeping up with Nerd Culture. I love writing and hope to introduce people to things that they may not have known about before through my articles.

We know that between 5,000 and 4,400 years ago Stonehenge was used as a cemetery. But what about what happened there before that? Well ceremonies were held and people gathered. And now there is scientific evidence that whatever they did inside the monument would have had great acoustics.

The acoustics not only would have been amplified by the structure but would have stayed inside. The stones and how they were placed would have helped to drown out the outside noise so that people could hear better what was going on inside. And the sound pollution to the outside would have been very minimal. This would have been a great place for a music festival but scientists believe that it was not ultimately designed for such purposes.

Because of how the stones were placed speech would have been contained inside the monument. Meaning that if they wanted to hold secret ceremonies they wouldn’t have had to worry about being overheard. How researchers found this out was by building a completed Stonehenge inside an acoustic room which was built to simulate an open space.

To explore Stonehenge’s sound dynamics, acoustical engineer Trevor Cox and colleagues used laser scans of the site and archaeological evidence to construct a physical model one-twelfth the size of the actual monument. That was the largest possible scale replica that could fit inside an acoustic chamber at the University of Salford in England, where Cox works. This room simulated the acoustic effects of the open landscape surrounding Stonehenge and compacted ground inside the monument.

ScienceNews.com
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0305440320301394

You can read about the entire process of finding all this out by reading the article here. There’s a lot that more techy people would be able to resonate with in the research article than I can. And to be honest, I just think it’s neat!

Latest News

Brain Eating Amoeba Found in Texas Water Supply

They are currently giving out bottled water until they can get the bacteria safely out of their systems.
Html code here! Replace this with any non empty raw html code and that's it.

Classic Power Rangers Morphin’ Figures Making a Return!

If you're someone who grew up in the 90s, chances are you wanted (or managed to get) Power Rangers action figures for...

Blumhouse’s Upcoming “The Craft: Legacy” Trailer Hits

It's almost spooky season, and that means Blumhouse FINALLY released a trailer for their upcoming revisit of 90's Gothy witchy classic, "The...

Disney Moving Forward with “The Lion King” Sequel, Barry Jenkins to Direct

This just in-Walt Disney Studios is definitely moving forward with a second live-action (yeah, we know, their words, not ours) "The...

Xbox Game Pass Ultimate is Upgrading on Series X Launch Day

Xbox Series X launch day is quickly approaching. As we barrel towards the next gen launch day, it seems we have even...
- Advertisement -

More Articles Like This